United Way’s 32 Free Tax Preparation Sites Open Across King County

The goal is to help struggling individuals and families keep more of what they earn

  • Monday, January 28, 2019 2:02pm
  • News

United Way of King County is ready to help individuals and families who earn less than $66,000 file their taxes.

When tax time comes around, thousands of hard-working people in King County face age, income, language or disability barriers.

Many are eligible for tax credits and refunds that could put them on a path to financial stability, but few can afford professional tax services. United Way has opened 32 Free Tax Preparation sites throughout King County, staffed by more than 1,000 IRS certified volunteers.

In addition to tax preparation services, there are a range of other community services and resources available including financial coaching, SNAP benefits, health care enrollment, utility assistance and more.

United Way encourages people affected by the recent government shutdown to visit a site near them to learn more about what resources are available to help.

While the IRS is schedule to begin processing tax returns for refunds on Monday, Jan. 28, due to major changes to the tax code and recent government shutdown, there may be delays in the processing refunds. People relying on their tax return to stay afloat and meet basic needs are encouraged to file early in the season.

To find a site location, languages available, a list of what to bring and other details, people can visit United Way’s Free Tax website at www.FreeTaxExperts.org. United Way Tax sites will remain open until April 18.

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