Photo courtesy of D’Ann Tedford 
                                Teaching the art of tie-dye is Ronda Duluoz, who works and resides in Covington.

Photo courtesy of D’Ann Tedford Teaching the art of tie-dye is Ronda Duluoz, who works and resides in Covington.

Tie-dye for Pride

Local and Seattle parades foster interest in tie-dye clothing

  • Sunday, June 16, 2019 1:30am
  • Opinion

Find a clean white t-shirt. Tightly roll up the shirt and secure it with rubber bands. Squirt on an array of your favorite bright tie-dye inks. Finally, insert your artwork into a plastic bag and wait for it to dry. You are now a designer of your own clothing, having created apparel appropriate for Maple Valley Days Parade or for Seattle’s Pride Parade on Sunday, June 30.

A recent tie-dye event held at Shepherd of the Valley Lutheran Church (SVLC) in Maple Valley was designed to teach all ages the uniqueness of tie-dye as art and to encourage community involvement. Of 15 participants, some noted how easy it was to design their apparel while the youngest ones squealed with pride at their accomplishment.

Pride is an easily accessed venue at SVLC. They have participated in Seattle’s Pride Parade for several years, showing their solidarity with LGBTQ+ friends and family members. They are joined by other Lutheran churches associated with Open Door Ministries, whose philosophy is “We march in PRIDE because as people of faith we must stand with those who, throughout much of its history, the church has not only marginalized, but demonized and ostracized. We march in hope and joy, making a public statement of God’s love for all people …”

The hope, joy and community involvement was evident at the tie-dying event. Bud Hut in Maple Valley donated all the plastic bags and rubber bands; SVLC provided t-shirts that had never been worn. Ashley Holloman of Bonney Lake, and Kelly Duluoz, who lives in Covington and works in Maple Valley, purchased boxes full of colorful paints and supplies. Ashley, Kelly and Ronda Duluoz all gave instruction for success in painting pride.

Logan Kantola, 9, from Tahoma Elementary School, says “All I wear is tie-dye.”
                                Photo courtesy of D’Ann Tedford.

Logan Kantola, 9, from Tahoma Elementary School, says “All I wear is tie-dye.” Photo courtesy of D’Ann Tedford.

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                                Photo courtesy of D’Ann Tedford.
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